Friday Five: The Caregiving Journey

| By Casa de la Luz

1. We’re always looking at articles that offer helpful advice for family caregivers. “Tips to help new – and veteran – family caregivers” offers six helpful reminders. It’s especially important to note that veteran caregivers may find these tips useful, too. Those who have been providing care to a loved one for a years especially need the reminders that you’re not alone or to take a break.

2. Each individual has a different story as to how they came to have “the conversation” with their loved ones. “The Conversation Project: It’s Time to Start Talking about End of Life” is a well-written story of how clinical psychologist Joseph Nowinski, Ph.d. had the conversation with his parents. Articles such as these help illustrate the many different ways families choose to have the conversation and organize end-of-life arrangements. They also serve as useful jumping-off points for families who may not know where to start the discussion.

3. Though studies show the majority of family caregivers are women, there is a growing number of male family caregivers. “The New Face of Alzheimer’s Caregivers: Men” states that the number of men caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia has gone from 19 percent to 40 percent in 15 years. Learn a little more about this new face in caregiving from this Sci-Tech Today article.

4. We regularly encourage seeking support from others in similar situations on this blog. This definitely applies to family caregivers. Sometimes it helps to share your story, and sometimes it helps to hear other people’s stories of their caregiving journeys. Caregiver Support Blog is just one of those millions of individual stories out there. Read about Michelle’s struggles as she provided care to Clara.

5. The Alzheimer’s Association website is a wealth of resources for family caregivers of a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Daily routines can be helpful to both caregiver and the caree; use this “creating a daily plan” article to help you when planning out your day and daily activities. If you have the time, consider exploring the Alzheimer’s Association website further for more suggestions and tips regarding daily care needs.

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